NEW MUSIC: Pardans – Hookers (with Hidden Depths) & Over The Moon And Beyond

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Here are two live studio session tracks from the Danish jazz-punk quintet Pardans. They’ve been together since 2015 and draw equally from the jazz world of Ornette Coleman and the darker, knottier sounds of post-punk and Captain Beefheart. There’s a great intensity and drive in these songs – woozy, rambunctious and lurching, like Birthday Party falling down the stairs at a jazz joint.

‘Hookers (With Hidden Depths)’ is the single from their recently released album Spit & Image.

NEW MUSIC: Marble Arch – I’m On My Way

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More new shoegaze sounds today! This time it’s courtesy of Frenchman Yann Le Razavet who, as Marble Arch, records music that draws heavily on the likes of New Order and Ride. He makes it sound effortless with cascading melodies, obscured vocals and synths and guitars that blur into one billowing vapour of 80s indie pop.

Marble Arch have a full album on the way in 2019.

NEW MUSIC: Sail Into Night – Glass

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We get sent a ton of music submissions and there’s so much uninspiring music that when something of the quality and resonance of Sail Into Night hits your headphones it really stands out.

This is the first music we’ve featured from Dubai, U.A.E. and the group is essentially the project of Pakistani duo Nabil Qizilbash and Zara Mahmood who have been writing together for three years. ‘Glass’ is a wonderful slow-burn of a track, built on Velvets meets JAMC slow-core drums, guitars that draw from shoegaze and American indie jangle and tone, droning harmonium and the intertwining voices of Nabil and Zara that wind gently around each other like hazy wisps of incense.

INTERVIEW: Matt Corby

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WINKING AT POP MUSIC

Matt Corby has come a long way from his solo folk beginnings. Here he takes us into the creative process behind his colourful new  second album, Rainbow Valley.

by Chris Familton

The album title suggests some kind of idealised nature-based community where everything exists in harmony and for Corby and his family, that’s why they’ve settled in the area of the same name, in the lush surrounds of Northern NSW. “The house is situated in an amazing tropical paradise where you only really hear birds. With that kind of silence comes a certain amount of focus. I wouldn’t have made an album that sounds like this if it was somewhere that wasn’t picturesque,” Corby believes. “It was fitting to call it Rainbow Valley because it marks the place that was needed to facilitate the record coming into existence. It’s quite a sunny feel through most of it but it does have some dark moments too. It’s quite happy in an introspective way,” he adds.

The physical process of finding inspiration and capturing those ideas has become music easier in Corby’s home, with the studio he’s set up there. “I have a space I can come to where everything is set up and ready to go with mic channels, a drum kit, synths, guitars and amps. That’s made the workflow heaps easier. I can go in there on a good week and do a couple of good songs.” 

Over a string of early EPs, Corby made his name with a strong folk sound that gained comparisons to Jeff Buckley and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young but he increasingly added soul and psychedelic influences. ARIA Awards and high charting singles followed, culminating in his debut album Telluric hitting #1 on the Australian charts. Now he’s taken the rich and modern psych-soul sound of that album and added some fascinating new angles and colours.

“I think it’s a continuation in my weird way. I never really want to make one thing again. This one is slightly more pop. It’s not necessarily pop music but it’s winking at it quite heavily. I could have gone really weird, which I naturally want to do, or have a crack and make something that is really palatable for lots of people without compromising too much,” says Corby.

The genesis of Rainbow Valley came from a few songs that didn’t make the final cut for Telluric. Corby then spent a year jamming and experimenting in his home studio with longtime friend and musical foil Alex Henriksson before he was ready to head to Byron Bay to again work with producer Dann Hume and put together the album. “Alex and I like the experimental phase and not necessarily the hard work of refining songs and trimming them and getting lyrics and melodies concise. We’d just put beats down and do fun sounding stuff. It got me to the point where when I was seriously writing songs for the album, 18 months ago, I had had all that experimentation behind me so it was easy in the moment to know what to do and reference those jams and pull bits out and use them,” Corby explains.

Corby’s creativity has evolved and matured to a point where he plays all the instruments on Rainbow Valley and he’s found the confidence and musical ability to find the sweet spot where a variety of genres blend seamlessly, where traditional and ultra modern sounds coexist and with a balance between experimentation and commercial viability.

“More and more I’m conscious of others in my creative process. I used to be against what others thought ‘fuck you, this is my art!’ Now that I’ve digested a lot of other music I understand things like what genres and time period things fit into and what referencing those does for a modern audience. It probably comes from doing music for a long time and it definitely comes into play when I make music,” Corby reflects. “When I hit something that feels good, I usually feel good because I think that other people will probably like it, which is kind of cool. Hopefully I’ve got that right on this record.”

NEW MUSIC: Mount Sinai – Weightless

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Mount Sinai from the United Kingdom is the work of songwriter Mark S. Aaron, formally known as Rooster Cole and frontman and songwriter of Black Black Hills. Weightless is a really nice noir-textured song that lurches along on piano and brass while Aaron intones dramatic soliloquies over the top of the dark mood below. It really hits its straps in the final minute where guitars rise to the fore and fight for space amid the skronking horns and insistent rhythm section.

NEW MUSIC: Joey Walker – On Top

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This song caught my attention early with a vocal sound and feel that reminded me of Wild Beasts. Stick with it and it’ll take you on a journey. It builds into a turbulent cacophony like Josh T Pearson’s Lift To Experience before the clouds part momentarily and a more darkly euphoric swell spirals upward for the last two minutes. It’s epic and immersive, emotive post-rock built on great dynamics and Walker’s fine voice.

“This is probably my most autobiographical song on the album,” Walker explains, “No–I haven’t murdered anyone, but I could’ve foreseen myself on a similar path if I gave into my sexual desires in a violent way like the character of the song. Even though the character ends up a murderer, he’s hardly to blame and easy to empathize with, maybe like Aileen Wuornos.”