NEWS: Thurston Moore announces ‘Rock n Roll Consciousness’ LP

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Thurston Moore has been teasing his new album in interviews over the last few months and today we get the official announcement of Rock n Roll Conciousness, due for release on April 28th via Caroline Australia.

It’s a five track album (track listing below) which features Deb Googe (My Bloody Valentine, Snowpony) bass, James Sedwards (Nøught, Chrome Hoof) guitar and Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Crucifucks) drums and was produced by Paul Epworth (Adele, Paul McCartney, Glass Animals) at The Church studios in Crouch End, London and mixed by Randall Dunn (Marissa Nadler, Earth).

Here’s the video clip for the second track to appear from the LP, ‘Smoke Of Dreams’.

ALBUM TRACKLISTING:

  1. Exalted
  2. Cusp
  3. Turn On
  4. Smoke of Dreams
  5. Aphrodite
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LIVE REVIEW: PIXIES @ Hordern Pavilion, Sydney, 07.03.17

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Returning for their fourth post-reunion Australian tour, Pixies have a new weapon in their arsenal in the form of last year’s album Head Carrier which saw a balanced return to their classic sound with fresh songwriting and a renewed edge.

In support, The Murlocs fulfilled their obligations but a 40 minute opening slot of mid-paced bluesy garage-rock fell flat ahead of the headliners dynamic onslaught. The end of their set was more interesting with a fuller sound courtesy of frontman Ambrose Kenny-Smith adding a second guitar but it was too little too late.

Pixies’ defining approach to their current live show is one of economy. With four stick clicks they were straight into Gouge Away from their seminal Doolittle album and from then on there were zero words spoken to the audience, little interplay between band members and just song after song in rapid-fire procession with nary a lull between songs, bar a few guitar changes. The breadth of their catalogue was on full display as they roared through new songs from Head CarrierUm Chagga Lagga and Frank Black’s blistering throat shredder Baal’s Back particular highlights and easily the equal of the band’s older songs.

Four figures, all clad in black and fairly static in their movements, were like an immoveable core in the eye of a storm as strobe lights, smoke and the music created the shapes and sounds around them. Joey Santiago’s guitar was urgent, dissonant and cut through more than ever while drummer David Lovering led from the back, the heartbeat and conductor of the band. Paz Lenchantin is well and truly bedded in as a key member of Pixies 2.0, exuding both confidence and deference to the songs.

Here Comes Your Man, Gigantic, Bone Machine and La La Love You were glaring omissions from the setlist but it was hard to complain on the back of 30-odd songs that demonstrated what a gloriously weird and obtuse band Pixies are. Instilling a mass sing-along to Monkey Gone to Heaven, Where Is My Mind? and Hey and then realigning synapses with the 30 year old frantic dash of Isla de Encanta, the manic schizo-gallop of Vamos and the fractured surf-thrash of Broken Face. Disappearing in a wall of noise, smoke and white light, Pixies remain the perfect example of a re-formed band still creatively alive, committed to their songs and audience.

Chris Familton

ALBUM REVIEW: Moon Duo – Occult Architecture Vol. 1

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Moon Duo return with the first of two albums they plan to release in 2017, with both volumes rooted in balanced and oppositional ideas and textures. The conceptual approach of the double album is, in their words “an intricately woven hymn to the invisible structures found in the cycle of seasons and the journey of day into night, dark into light.” That Yin Yang format won’t of course make complete sense until Vol. 2 is released later in the year but for now you can be assured that Moon Duo are still doing what they do best – laying down dense, surging and grinding psych rock rhythms.

Their music is always one of perpetual motion and since their first releases, which were dominated by a colder and more mechanical mood, they’ve slowly evolved to find a unique common ground between machine-like repetition, Sanae Yamada’s kosmiche synth washes and melodies and the free-spirited guitar explorations courtesy of Ripley Johnson.

On Occult Architecture Vol. 1, the term primitive futurism keeps coming to mind. The pair conjure up images of mysterious shadowy figures, druids, shamanistic rituals and pagan mysticism with their obfuscated lyrics and general dark tones and textures. They also invoke the spirit of astral travel and space travel, their songs often resembling a object hurtling through space and free of any earthly restraint. There’s a certain cyber quality to the shape and relentless drive of Moon Duo, albeit infused with human emotions – both good and bad.

‘Cold Fear’ induces just that – a queasy feeling of unease which makes it a less aggressive descendent of Suicide’s experiments at putting their audiences in a state of discomfort. ”Cross Town Fade’ is a curious blend of a tranced-out Sigue Sigue Sputnik stuck in a glam boogie vortex while ‘Will Of The Devil’ spins on an axis of insistent drumming with a yearning, melancholic synth melody sounding like a lost transmission from the point where Joy Division became New Order.

The album closer ‘White Rose’ emerges from the dark mist into a more optimistic world, one built on a perfect Krautrock rhythm and Johnson’s guitar sounding like a demonstrative insect buzzing and demanding to be heard. The glorious drone rolls on for ten minutes, onward and upward toward the light and presumably its spring/summer-centric sibling album.

It’s a fascinating journey, with or without the overarching concept, and reinforces the ability of Moon Duo to create music that is both sonically straightjacketed, endlessly immersive and without visible horizons.

Chris Familton

LIVE REVIEW: Margaret Glaspy

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Margaret Glaspy + Slow Dancer @ Newtown Social Club, 6th March 2017

Slow Dancer had the task of warming the crowd and for the most part the Oh Mercy guitarist (Simon Okely) caught and maintained their attention with his brand of solo, soulful indie music. He has a fine line in emotive chords and a guitar sound like garage rock filtered through a slowed, stoned and hazy late-night filter. Lyrically his songs fell short though, resorting for the most part to tortured-love subject matter, and with one of those faux-soul voices (should we blame Bon Iver?) it all blended into a warm and sugary bowl of overdone, saved intermittently by his guitar playing.

Margaret Glaspy’s debut album is called Emotions and Math and that title works equally well as description of her live show. From the outset she sat the audience back on their heels with a band that sit right in the pocket – clever, subtle and intricate but never showy. The full impact from the opening notes of Love Like This came from her percussive, rhythmic guitar playing that swung from sweet, lowdown riffs to slashing, tension-laden and clanging chords. And then there’s that voice. It’s familiar in the vein of Liz Phair, Feist, Bjork, Joan Wasser and even the ancient-sounding folk of Karen Dalton, yet it is laced with contemporary influences like R&B. She has a raw, growling inflection that provides the emotion to the structured and faultlessly played math of her songs. Combine that with hushed sensual tones and some diva-worthy note runs and Glaspy was an endlessly fascinating singer, complementing her set with a brace of stunning covers of songs by Neil Young, Lauren Hill, Bjork and Lucinda Williams.

Watching and listening to Glaspy reminded me of those early days when Jeff Buckley began to make waves on the back of his undeniable natural talent as a singer, guitarist and songwriter. You could hear the craft but the raw emotion and barely-contained creativity was just as crucial. From the same streets of New York, Glaspy is surely about to make a similar artistic statement based on this performance.

Chris Familton

NEW MUSIC: Spoon – Can I Sit Next To You

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Spoon (Britt Daniel, drummer Jim Eno, bassist Rob Pope and Alex Fischel on keyboards and guitar) are releasing their new LP Hot Thoughts on March 17th via Matador Records/Remote Control Records. They’ve already released the first single and now they’ve posted the warped and spooky clip for the keyboard-heavy clip for ‘Can I Sit Next To You’, reminiscent to our ears of The Cure and Prince in the clipped rhythm.

Spoon – Sydney & Melbourne Headline Shows

Thursday 23rd March – Metro Theatre, Sydney

Saturday 25th March – Croxton Bandroom, Melbourne

LIVE REVIEW: Car Seat Headrest

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Car Seat Headrest + Jarrow @ Oxford Art Factory, Sydney 26.01.17

There was a real ‘will they or won’t they?’ atmosphere rippling through the arriving throng of punters as Jarrow took the stage. The nervousness was due to Car Seat Headrest main guy Will Toledo posting on Facebook earlier in the day that he was was here and ready to play but the band were still winging their way to Australia from Hawaii (courtesy of flight delays) and only scheduled to arrive an hour before they were due on-stage.

As people made bets on the band vs solo probability, Melbourne’s Jarrow did an excellent job in their opening slot. There were shades of The Smiths and Mac DeMarco in their music with clever twists and turns, a malleable rhythm section and Dan Oke’s quirky, heart-on-sleeve lyrics. Playing songs from their 2016 album 2003 Dream they displayed a balance of humour, musicianship, loose-limbed abandon and intellectual adventurism. Clever guitar pop for both the mind and feet.

Not long after Jarrow departed the stage, four figures emerged from the shadows and began furtively setting up their equipment and tuning guitars. The band had made it and just in time. Presumably wired and slightly disorientated they quickly conducted a make-shift soundcheck before launching into their set proper with Vincent, one of the many standout tracks from last year’s breakout album Teens Of Denial. It quickly became apparent how much of a complete band they are, rather than just Toledo and some other guys. Vocals were shared – guitarist Ethan Ives even got a lead vocal in the closing Pixies cover of Motorway To Roswell. The rhythm section were superb at building the tension and collapsing it on a dime when required. The audience in the sold-out and packed to the gunnels OAF were in fine voice, nearly drowning out the band during Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales, exhorting the band on through the jet lag as they laid down their refreshing blend of Okkervil River/Strokes/Pixies influenced indie rock. It felt like a celebratory, if a little short, set. The icing on the cake and reward for the devoted fans of Toledo and his literate and confessional songs.

Chris Familton