INTERVIEW: Django Django (2018)



On the eve of the release of their third album, Marble Skies, and an hour before they take the stage in London to launch it, drummer/producer David Maclean chats with Chris Familton about where the inspiration comes from in the creation of their multifaceted sound.

Django Django are now three albums deep into a career that started with a bang when they released their debut self-titled album, garnered a Mercury Prize nomination and set off on a two year world tour. That segued straight into the follow-up album Born Under Saturn which nearly derailed the band entirely when they hit breaking point. Now they’ve regrouped, built a studio and rediscovered the essence of their music – that dizzying blend of electronic pop, surf guitar and postmodern psychedelia. “Now we’re back into it and excited again!” says Maclean.

With the stage beckoning, he admits that the band are always a bit edgier when taking out new songs for the first time and that they need to be worn in. “It’s always a bit nervy playing them the first few times so they’ll have to settle in a bit and they’ll keep changing and morphing and getting better and better until you kind of go on autopilot a bit and then you can kind sort of enjoy it and just relax and get in the groove a lot more.”

Marble Skies finds the band sounding more settled and focused than ever before and Maclean pinpoints a greater confidence in how they work together. “We’re definitely getting a bit more confident, but you don’t want to get carried away just because you can do something. We don’t want to get obsessed with the techniques. On the first record we didn’t now what we were doing and that was all we needed at the time. Our songwriting is getting better and we strive to keep working because we want our records to be played on the radio in 20 years time like Gerry Rafferty or Blondie or Cat Stevens,” Maclean enthuses.

In hindsight Maclean sees some mistakes with the recording of their previous album Born Under Saturn. “With the last album we went to Angelic which was the keyboardist from Jamiroquai, Toby Smith’s studio. It was a huge studio in the countryside and I guess we felt a little out of our depth as we hadn’t written any songs before we went there,” he laughs. “We ended up being in the communal living room all the time writing songs, even though we were paying thousands a day for the whole place. It’s not really in the spirit of where we came from or how I grew up with a four-track making music. We were more comfortable this time,” says Maclean, referring to their own new studio.

One of the key characteristics of their sound is the fusion of different genres and organic and digital instrumentation. “I think I’ve always been quite good at finding threads in different music. I remember listening to Public Enemy when I was younger and having that eureka moment realising they were sampling Jimi Hendrix licks and mixing in beats. Even looking at their production style and the similarities to what The Beatles were doing. These were all people just experimenting creatively. All music is a lot more connected than people think.”


ALBUM REVIEW: Django Django – Marble Skies


In the past Django Django have managed to wrangle the seemingly disparate styles of electronic pop and rockabilly rhythms into songs that roll and pulse, both on the dance floor and as highly attractive synth pop. They continue that template here but it all sounds more refined and cohesive.

Their trademark vocal delivery and the way the melodies and harmonies are layered and blended is still the most distinct aspect of their sound. The area where they’ve gained the most traction and taken their songs forward is in the composition and instrumental arrangements. They run the gamut from the sugary jackhammer rhythm and Suicide meets early Depeche Mode of the title track  through to the Jan Hammer assisted piano, dreamy kosmiche vibe of the excellent Sundials. Both Tic-Tac-Toe and In Your Beat excel at marrying brain activity and feet movement with dizzying precision and economy, while the clipped guitar riff of Further reminds that they are still a band that play live instruments.

Marble Skies’ electronic pop psychedelia is a fine soundtrack for the summer months, immediately appealing music from thinking musicians who know how to find that balance between creativity and accessibility.

Chris Familton

ALBUM REVIEW: Kyle Craft – Full Circle Nightmare


This is Kyle Craft’s second album; his first set a high bar with its songs of underground heroes and misfits and now he’s taken that momentum and set one dizzying and rambunctious musical snowball in motion.

Craft is still mining the same stories he relishes and excels at, singing of junkies and angels, late night bars, existential crises and the overwhelming worlds of love and lust. He packs a plethora of words into his songs like a pop-up jack-in-the-box, rhyming couplets and lyrics tumbling out with unabashed emotion and enthusiasm as he swings from sweet crooning to bluesy howls. The deal breaker is his voice which serves as the perfect delivery method for his voluminous tales. There’s more than a touch of Dylan-esque fantastical imagery, stream of consciousness and kaleidoscopic word association that allows his rock ’n’ roll songs to embrace psych-pop and country soul – like Syd Barrett dancing with The Band.

Heartbreak Junky finds the best balance between frantic musical rush and measured poeticism while Belmont (One Trick Pony) comes off as a cross between Jack White and Jet. “Stranded down on Silver St, just throwing bottles at the Delta Queen” is one of many fine lines on Slick & Delta Queen as Craft paints his compelling vignettes. It sums up the wild streak of creativity that Craft is riding for all its worth on Full Circle Nightmare.

Chris Familton

PREMIERE: The New Single from Dave Graney & Clare Moore

Dave Graney and Clare Moore

Dave Graney & Clare Moore (The Moodists – Dave Graney and the Coral Snakes and currently Dave Graney and the mistLY) have been making music together since the late 70’s with shared involvement in over 30 albums.

Doubtful Sounds are pleased to premiere their brand new single ‘Song Of Life’, with an accompanying clip featuring footage of the sartorially elegant pair in Luxembourg last year. The song follows their 2017 album Let’s Get Tight.

‘Song Of Life’ is a lush and slinky, jazz-tinged slice of lounge pop. It sashays out of the shadows on a low, loose and liquid groove, recalling everyone from David Sylvian to Morphine, Style Council to Serge Gainsbourg.

Dave Graney & Clare Moore 2018 Tour Dates:

  • Feb 7th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at Smiths Alternative in Canberra, ACT
  • Feb 8th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at DisGracelands, Wollongong, NSW. SOLD OUT!
  • Feb 9th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at the Agrestic Grocer, Orange, NSW
  • Feb 10th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at the Metropole Guesthouse in Katoomba, NSW
  • Feb 11th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at Dangar island Bowling Club, NSW,
  • Feb 16th – Dave Graney an the mistLY at the Grand Hotel, 124 Main st – Mornington, Victoria
  • Feb 17th – Dave Graney solo at the Gem bar , Wellington st Collingwood.
  • Wed 21st Feb, a WORKSHY event at Geelong Library in Victoria
  • Thursday Feb 22nd, a WORKSHY event at Avid Readers in Brisbane.
  • Friday Feb 23rd Dave Graney and Clare Moore at the Bison Bar in Nambour, Qld
  • Saturday Feb 24th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at THE JUNK BAR in Ashgrove , Qld – SOLD OUT 4pm matinee show now added! SOLD OUT
  • Sunday Feb 25th Dave Graney and Clare Moore at THE JUNK BAR in Ashgrove, Qld.(4pm SOLD OUT
  • New Show added for 7pm Sunday 25th )
  • March 11th Dave Graney and the mistLY at SOUNDS IN THE SECRET GARDEN – the Events Foundry,74 Brougham st, Geelong.
  • Sundays in April – Dave Graney and the mistLY at the Croxton Hotel front room – Coburg, Victoria
  • April 28th – Dave Graney and the Coral Snakes – Dashville/Gumball Festival – NSW
“The Serge Gainsbourg/Lee Hazelwood/Jim Morrison/Scott Walker/Skip Spence/Ern Malley/Lenny Bruce of Australian music. A genius songwriter with effortless presence and command, and yet also an invisible chameleon, a reflecting surface, an anonymous conduit.” – Stewart Lee



If anything, their music inhabits even darker territory, the songs collapsing in on themselves as they chug and career along – The Terminals, Antiseptic

In this day and age of accessibility and cultural saturation, it can be hard to unearth music you like, and at the same time discover new music outside the mainstream or the most prominent online access points. Digging through the detritus and overload, I’ve found that more and more I lock onto albums that give a little extra. They create their own world of music for the 30-60 minutes you spend with them. They make you wonder how the artists wrote the songs, how they composed the music. I was drawn to imperfect performances, atmosphere over precision (though The War On Drugs manage to exemplify both), melody, energy, intelligence and rhythm.

My favourite album of the year probably won’t feature on any other list you read (though hopefully it does). The Terminals, from NZ, released a record that mainlines a sense of musical nostalgia in my synapses, harkening back to the music of my teens and early 20’s in the NZ underground. The legacy of Flying Nun, alternative rock and darkly emotive music from a couple of islands at the end of the Earth. In my review I said “The Terminals have never been creatively stronger than they are on Antiseptic. It’s their finest album and the sound of musicians digging deep and exploring a lifetime of musical influences and experiences without concession to anything outside of their own ideas and instruments.”

Elsewhere you’ll find all manner of musical styles, from eccentric folk to kraut-tronica, country to ragged suburban punk rock, gothic 80s synth to skronking saxophone. Dig deep and enjoy.


1. The Terminals – Antiseptic REVIEW


2. Aldous Harding – Party REVIEW


3. Kevin Morby – City Music


4. Thurston Moore – Rock N Roll Consciousness REVIEW

the tall grass

5. The Tall Grass – Down The Unmarked Road REVIEW


6. Protomartyr – Relatives In Descent REVIEW


7. Jep and Dep – They’veBeenCalled REVIEW

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8. Underground Lovers – Staring At You, Staring At Me REVIEW


9. The War On Drugs – A Deeper Understanding REVIEW


10. Suicide Swans – Augusta

11. Hurray For The Riff Raff – The Navigator

12. Ryan Adams – Prisoner REVIEW

13. Chris Forsyth & The Solar Motel Band – Dreaming In The Non-Dream

14. Jen Cloher – Jen Cloher REVIEW

15. Omni – Multi-Task

16. David Rawlings – Poor David’s Almanack

17. Traveller – Western Movies

18. Daniel Romano – Modern Pressure

19. The Texas Gentlemen – TX Jelly

20. LCD Soundsystem – American Dream

21. Bed Wettin’ Bad Boys – Rot

22. Hollow Everdaze – Cartoons REVIEW

23. Feral Ohms – Feral Ohms

24. Mogwai – Every Country’s Sun

25. Pissed Jeans – Why Love Now REVIEW

26. Colin Stetson – All This I Do For Glory

27. Laura Marling – Semper Femina

28. Trevor Sensor – Andy Warhol’s Dream

29. The Singing Skies – Head In The Trees, Heart On The Ground REVIEW

30. Mount Kimbie – Love What Survives

31. Chomper – Medicine Mountain

32. Ricardo Villalobos – Empirical House

33. The Afghan Whigs – In Spades REVIEW

34. Marty Stuart – Way Out West REVIEW

35. Chain And The Gang – Best Of Crime Rock REVIEW

36. Karl Blau – Out Her Space REVIEW

37. Chris Robinson Brotherhood – Barefoot In The Head REVIEW

38. Destroyer – ken REVIEW

39. John Maus – Screen Memories

40. Gold Class – Drum REVIEW

ALBUM REVIEW: Beaches – Second Of Spring

Beaches 2017

Beaches go into overdrive on their new seventeen track album. It’s their magnum opus of sorts, taking everything they’ve explored on the first two albums and synthesising it into one kaleidoscopic take on all things psychedelic.

The album opens with two relentlessly churning tracks that set the stage for what is to follow. It signals their intent to push further out into the sonic aether, bridging the gap between melodic noisy pop hooks and hypnotic guitar-drenched head trips. Void is a brighter, headlong take on Wooden Shjips, psych-Kraut interstellar explorations while on track four they ease up on the gas and introduce chiming guitars, a post-punk interlude and a back half that sounds like The Primitives jamming with Look Blue Go Purple. Calendar sounds like a lost Pixies outtake with its mix of raw grind and dreamy vocals while Wine dives and shimmers like Crazy Horse doing shoegaze.

Arrow is the headiest pop rush the quintet have conjured up, the perfect nugget for the approaching warmer months and it feels like the apex of Second Of Spring. In the back third Bronze Age Babies adds a surprise with a recorder voicing the main melody before Grey Colours takes a gloriously melancholic wander that Robert Smith would be proud of. There’s a lot to take in but it’s an endlessly rewarding and freewheeling album for a band who are the equal sum of their parts and eager to explore all musical possibilities.

Chris Familton


ALBUM REVIEW: Karl Blau – Out Her Space


Karl Blau experienced a taste of wider critical acclaim on the back of his last album Introducing Karl Blau. The title and the fact that it was a collection of country covers was somewhat misleading, given that he’s has already released something more than 20 albums. With Out Her Space, Blau has shape-shifted into the world of avant rock, funk and soul, eschewing his lo-fi origins and retaining the lush production quality of his last album.

There are clear comparisons that can be made with another inquisitive songwriter such as Bill Callahan and Will Oldham. Callahan and Blau also share a love of dub music, the latter reconfiguring the Paul Simon/bong-inhaling sound of Poor The War Away into Dub The War Away, a tripped-out bass-heavy excursion that would make Bill Laswell proud. Valley Of Sadness is an attempt at pastoral psychedelia but it ends up sounding frivolous and unnecessary. Blue As My Name finds a nice brisk strum into Love territory, I Got The Sounds Like You Got The Blues draws jazz horns into Blau’s pulsing rhythmic orbit before the eight minute Where You Goin’ Papa goes on a poly-genre journey akin to Harry Nilsson singing the hits of every section in the record store. This is a fine exercise in fearless and inventive songwriting.

Chris Familton