NEW MUSIC: Peter Bibby – Medicine

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The larrikin troubadour returns with his first new release since his 2014 debut Butcher/Hairstylist/Beautician. ‘Medicine’ rolls and tumbles along with his trademark stagger and loose swagger. Super catchy, twitchy and jangly as he rattles off all kinds of medicinal relief. Top stuff.

The track is available September 8 via Spinning Top / Caroline and Bibby plays Big Sound next week:

Tue, Sep 5th | 11:30pm @ Ric’s Big Backyard

Thu, Sep 7th | 11:40pm @ The Foundry

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ALBUM REVIEW: Underground Lovers – Staring at You Staring At Me

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Still one of the leading lights of the Australian strand of guitar strummed, literate indie pop/rock songs, Underground Lovers have influenced the sound of many a local band over the years from The Sleepy Jackson to Blank Realm and on to Shining Bird. They’ll no doubt continue to hold that sphere of influence with their latest and one of their best albums.

Staring At You Staring At Me is a multi-dimensional collection of songs, stretching from the experimental clatter and propulsive dirge of ‘Glamnesia’ to the alt-rock swagger of ‘Every Sign’, ‘The Rerun”s cold synth, reminiscent of their exceptional 1998 single ‘Cold Feeling’ and on to the glorious indie-rock melancholia of ‘Conde Nast Trap’.

They don’t put a foot wrong and they continue to produce effortless sounding and richly melodic music.

Chris Familton

NEW MUSIC: Die! Die! Die! – How Soon Is Too Soon (It’s Not Vintage It’s Used)

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New Zealanders Die! Die! Die! are back with a new album and a new clip for the single ‘How Soon Is Too Soon (It’s Not Vintage It’s Used)’. It’s definitely not as punk driven and intense as some of their earlier material but it’s equally as commanding, drawing on distorted and looped effects and a kind of warmly-detached Bailter Space feel as the song circles around some fine bass playing.

The new album Charm. Offensive. is due out October 6th via the label Banished From The Universe. Preorders are now available from Flying Out.

ALBUM REVIEW: Boris – Dear

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Boris are now 25 years into a career that has stretched from the barren expanse of doom to hazy dream pop renderings and onto avant garde soundscapes and blistering, psychedelic punk rock. They hone in on a style and explore it to its logical extreme. On Dear they again hit the heavy button but this time they go deep into the detail, exploring both heaviosity and spaciousness.

There is usually a reactionary element to the way Boris approach a new album and given that their last release, Noise (2014), blended space rock, grunge and prog it was to be expected they’d retreat into the shadows again and dispense with traditional rock song structures. Dear is post-metal deconstructed and amplified. The drums sound like they were recorded in a cavernous tomb, the guitars are distorted to the point where they sound like sonic locusts and the bass rumbles with tectonic gravitas.

Boris haven’t abandoned their rockets tendencies altogether though. ‘Absolutego’ lumbers and crashes with both punk and metal ferocity, ‘Biotope’ is weighty shoegaze not dissimilar to Smashing Pumpkins, ‘Dystopia (Vanishing Point)’ sounds like J Mascis shredding over Pink Floyd and ‘Beyond’ pushes the limits of quiet/loud dynamics. Boris are at their best in these kinds of songs, where they find that sweet spot between noise and melody and where those contrasting elements blend and overlap, combining to produce emotional and physical music.

The rest of the album is much more introspective and indulgent, albeit in a fascinating way from the perspective of sonic architecture and sound design. Thunderous and screaming chords hang in the air, crashing drums enter and exit at seemingly random moments and Wata’s lead guitar is gloriously alien in the way it is played and processed. The ideal way to experience these songs would be standing directly in front of the band’s amplifiers, all on 11, feeling the sound as much as hearing it. ‘Karego’ threatens to melt speaker cones with the density and drone of the guitars while ‘The Power’ sounds like an attempt at inter-dimensional communication with everything in the red, bristling and pushing at its digital fabric.

The human voices in closer ‘Dear’ are guttural and exultant. A primitive greeting card and the most organic moment on the record. It sounds like Boris laid bare, a monumental encapsulation of their music and given that initially Dear was intended as a possible farewell record, it’s an open-ended way to finish the album and leaves both Boris and their fans asking where the trio will go next.

Chris Familton

 

ALBUM REVIEW: Hollow Everdaze – Cartoons

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Artistically speaking, pop art is an apt description of the style and approach that Hollow Everdaze have near-perfected on Cartoons.

A decade into their career they’re still uncovering lush, sun-kissed pop nuggets that swoon, sway and deftly swagger through 60s eccentricity, 80s/90s British indie and right up to the modernism of a band such as Spoon. There’s a wistful quality to the songs yet they invest just the right amount of grit and depth to keep them grounded.

The distorted guitar on the title track and Flat Battery, the bass and reverb on Running Away, and the violin on Same Old Story and the warped psychedelia of Still Ticking all add fascinating tangents and layers to their sound.

This is sophisticated pop music par excellence, endlessly inventive, devoid of schtick and all class.

Chris Familton

Cartoons is out now via Deaf Ambitions.

 

ALBUM REVIEW: The Terminals – Antiseptic

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New Zealand rock unit The Terminals have been operating under various iterations for 30 years and at the band’s core, Stephen Cogle and Peter Stapleton (with Mick El Borado) have kept the ship on course and sailing a straight line into dark and swirling post punk and psych-laden garage rock.

Antiseptic finds the band on top of their game once more. If anything their music inhabits even darker territory, the songs collapsing in on themselves as they chug and career along on the back of Stapleton’s often urgent drumming. Compared to the slightly more twee and pop-considered sound of Uncoffined, their album from 1990, Antiseptic operates more in the shadows, with that bruised melancholic vibe that is such a recurring streak through their contemporaries such as The Chills, The Clean and Able Tasmans.

El Borado’s organ amplifies the kinship with The Clean and The Chills, its primitive, off-kilter psychedelic circus sound adding layers of swirling melody and disconcerting chaos. Beneath that the guitars are webs of fuzz and screeching distortion, moody gothic strumming and distant discordant soloing – the perfect backdrop to Cogle’s ominous, stentorian voice that bleeds anguish and pleading across songs that only hint at the core of their subject matter.

The highlights of the album are aplenty, there isn’t a weak track among the eight. The title track possesses a nervous insistency courtesy of Nicole Moffat’s violin, the undulating rhythm of ‘Edge Of The Night’s’ verses segues into a glorious see-sawing chorus while the grinding metal and anxiety-inducing sound of ‘Runaway Train’ drives the tension skyward before the heavens open with the glorious, open-ended ‘The Rain Has Come and Gone’ and its warm and comforting Velvet Underground/Krautrock drone. From there the template is set as they conjure wonderfully skewed soundscapes and art rock diversions through to the closing pulse of ‘Light Years Away’.

The Terminals have never been creatively stronger than they are on Antiseptic. It’s their finest album and the sound of musicians digging deep and exploring a lifetime of musical influences and experiences without concession to anything outside of their own ideas and instruments.

Chris Familton