NEW MUSIC: Golden Fang – Spooner’s Lookout

Sydney’s Golden Fang release the second single from their new album here. now here. (produced by Jay Whalley of Frenzal Rhomb)

Golden Fang, a melodic guitar band that captures the joys and contradictions of life in Sydney’s Inner West, are an indie rock group in the truest sense – independently releasing their own unique blend of rock music since 2014.

Cast an ear back across the last three decades and you’ll hear the influence of the Pixies, The Drones and Straitjacket Fits mixing sonically with the dirty grooves of the Bad Seeds and The Cruel Sea. Like local Sydney acts such as Peabody, Bluebottle Kiss and Crow, Golden Fang are a band that know how to harness poetry and visceral rock ’n’ roll.

Following the album’s first single ‘Don’t Take Your God To Town’, Golden Fang stretch out on the glorious slow-building ‘Spooner’s Lookout’. The song begins on a wistful, acoustic note before sonic layers are added and the rest of the band charges into full view, a musical vista of angular guitars and rock-solid drums blossoming before the listener’s ears.

Singer, songwriter Carl Redfern says of the song, “Though the songs not really about the place, A friend sent me a photo taken off the sign post for Spooners Lookout in the Blue Mountains with just the note ‘Looners Spookout’ (which will be a song at some point in the future). The photo lived on my wall for years it always made me smile and I never really ever wondered where the place actually was. Then, not that long ago I was in the Blue Mountains and discovered the lookout and I was struck by a powerful sense of melancholy as I was reminded of my friend who had been so important to me but was then lost to me not long after I got that photo. It’s basically a long lost love song.”

In terms of the approach the band too to the writing and arranging of ‘Spooner’s Lookout’, bassist Justin Tauber says, “We like to keep things simple in the Fang. Carl’s writing and Teo’s guitar playing are really laconic and direct. So, when Carl brought ‘Spooner’s Lookout’ into the rehearsal room, it was unusual in that there were a lot of different parts to the song,” he explains. “It presented an opportunity for us to stretch ourselves a little, and explore the dynamic and emotional range of the band. There’s memory and love and even a little regret in this song. You don’t expect that from a garage band, but I think we’re all grown ups and we know what that’s like. So I’m really happy how this one turned out.”

NEW MUSIC: Wax Chattels – Cede

PHOTO CREDIT: Ebru Yildiz

The Aotearoa/New Zealand trio Wax Chattels release the final single from their new album Clot, out September 25 via Flying Nun and Captured Tracks.

The vitriolic choruses of ‘Cede’ are in Amanda Cheng’s (bass/vocals) native language — Taiwanese Hokkien — and are an indignant confrontation about Cross-Strait relations and self-determination.

Amanda Cheng on ‘Cede’ — “I am angry. Saying “you don’t know who I am” in Taiwanese Hokkien is to say “you don’t get to tell me who I am”. You don’t just scream like this to put on an album — you scream like this because it’s the only thing you can do.

This song is an affront to the near-silent cultural genocide that’s taking place — the censorship, the militant threats — and the international community’s insistence on practicing diplomacy with economics at the front of mind. If it takes a loud song that’s half in an unfamiliar language for people to ask, “what’s that about?”, then so be it.”
 

Amanda Cheng on the video for ‘Cede‘ below — “I set out to make a video that was unenjoyable to watch; unhinging a domestic, ‘safe’ setting. To contrast the blunt lyrics, the thematic statements in the video are more subtle — there’s a geopolitical narrative there, but you’ll miss it.”

The video was directed by Amanda, with the helping hands of Annabel Kean and Callum Devlin of Sports Team.

PRE-ORDER AND SAVE CLOT

NEW MUSIC: Elephant Castle – My Muse + Life In Outer Space

We recently posted the Elephant Castle track ‘I’m A Loser‘, which we loved. Now we’re stoked to also share the newer songs ‘My Muse‘ and ‘Life In Outer Space‘.

Both songs are further examples of the kaleidoscopic psych-pop goodness created by Los Angeles-based singer and multi-instrumentalist ​Phil Danyew who played in Foster The People for six years before leaving to focus on his own music as Elephant Castle. The tracks are also great examples of how to imbue life and playful energy into psych sounds – which are often too sterile and lacking verve.

Of ‘My Muse’, Danyew says “It was inspired by the sacred and addicting process of creating – the feeling that music and lyrics are channeled rather than entirely self-generated.” Heading into the starry skies with ‘Life In Outer Space’, he describes the songs as “a cosmic love story that starts in a park and ends in outer space.”

NEWS: Golden Fang release the first single from their new album

Sydney band Golden Fang announce the release of ‘Don’t Take Your God To Town’, the first single from their fourth studio album, Here. Now Here. (produced by Jay Whalley of Frenzal Rhomb), due out on August 7th, 2020.

Golden Fang, a melodic guitar band that captures the joys and contradictions of life in Sydney’s Inner West, are an indie rock group in the truest sense – independently releasing their own unique blend of rock music since 2014.

Cast an ear back across the last three decades and you’ll hear the influence of the Pixies, The Drones and Straitjacket Fits mixing sonically with the dirty grooves of the Bad Seeds and The Cruel Sea. Like local Sydney acts such as Peabody, Bluebottle Kiss and Crow, Golden Fang are a band that know how to harness poetry and visceral rock ’n’ roll.

Receiving its world premiere on UK indie website Backseat Mafia, ‘Don’t Take Your God To Town’ announces its arrival with clanging guitar chords and a primitive rhythm before it blossoms into sweet and reticent vocal and guitar melodies. Musically there’s both a tumbling swagger and a haunting shoegaze quality, courtesy of the guest vocals of artist Donna Amini, that gives it a beguiling, contradictory sound.

‘Don’t Take Your God To Town’ is in tune with bands such as the Pixies, Nick Cave and even a touch of the Tindersticks – you get the picture: intelligent, driving music with a touch of gothic grit and a hint of late night smoky bars, a squinting eye and clenched teeth. Melodic malevolence at its finest. Golden Fangs indeed.”
– 
Arun Kendall (Backseat Mafia)

Of the song, singer/guitarist Carl Redfern says, “‘Don’t Take Your God To Town’ was a song that took me a while to write. It started out specifically being about a dysfunctional personal relationship but eventually ended up being less specifically a dark groove and meditation on the feeling of dread and hopelessness I, and I’m sure many people, feel when looking at the seemingly endless parade of grifters and corrupt fanatics that infest social media and public life. The abandonment of reason in the denial of climate change, the horror-show of border policing and the sobering realisation that “we’ve” lost all these battles.”

From the melancholic, melodic classicism of opener ‘Clouds Go Round’ to the gritty power-pop of ‘Bad Actors’, the cowbell suburban hoedown of ‘Cowboy For Love’ (a love song dedication to good friend and confidant of the band – Jo Meares) to the punk rockabilly rave of ‘Jonny Your Money’s No Good’ and on through the dark gothic dissonance of ‘Tonight We’re Gonna Party Like It’s Dunedin 1989’ and the wandering autumnal psychedelia of ‘Gold Chains And Card Games’ – the range and depth on display across Here. Now Here. marks it as a cohesive statement of modern Australian guitar rock.

In recording sessions at his Pet Food Factory studio in Marrickville, NSW, during Australia’s black summer of 2020, producer Jay Whalley (of Frenzal Rhomb)has captured the sound of a band that doesn’t hide its rough edges. It celebrates the energy and swagger of their live shows and the artful belligerence of Redfern’s lyrics and delivery. The earthy quality of his voice and questioning lyrics add a layer of irreverence and intimacy to the music as it weaves and crashes around him.

“It’s the first album we’ve done where the line up has had a sense of stability about it and where we were writing and working on the songs with an eventual album being the main focus while putting the songs together,” explains Redfern. “For Here. Now Here. we allowed ourselves a bit more time so that we could get things as we wanted them rather than how they ended up on the day! In that regard I think we can say it’s our most considered album.”

“Musically the album has a harder or darker edge than our previous work but draws water from some of the same wells as we have on previous albums with songs about anxiety, personal reflection and nostalgia with a healthy dash of humour thrown in. We cycle through lots of songs pull them to pieces, chop them up and mould them till we’re left with a collection of tunes that everyone is happy with. We’re kind of like a rock n roll Rotary Club,” grins Redfern.

NEW MUSIC: Black Rabbit George – Fingers Radio

File this one under psychedelic but it’s not of the manic garage rock or pop variety. ‘Fingers Radio‘ by the Gold Coast’s Black Rabbit George locks into a liquid bass and metronomic drum pattern right from the start and averts its gaze. That synchronicity and anchor allows Paul George (Tijuana Cartel) to wander vocally, like he’s negotiating a trip or a dream, drifting in blissed-out awe through a fog. Guitar lines intertwine and curl themselves around the rhythm section – a subtle blend of North African and Asian influences that dial straight into the psych feel of the track.

The utterly hypnotic single is the first taste of his new album Warren, due for release on August 28th.

“I spent a lot of time isolated at home toying with ideas I’ve had over the years. I’ve pretty much lived in the studio for the last 6 months, just toying with where I can take the things I’ve learnt and how they all make sense together. ‘Fingers Radio’ is one of the songs that came from these sessions.”

NEW MUSIC: IDLES – A Hymn

IDLES have released ‘A Hymn’, a new single and accompanying video clip from their forthcoming new album Ultra Mono, set for release on 25 September 2020 on Partisan Records.

The music video features the band driving with their parents through their hometown streets to the shops, providing a grey window into suburban English life that matches the song’s heavyhearted churn.

Frontman Joe Talbot says of the song: “‘A Hymn’ is a hymn that rejoices in the sinister flesh-eating virus of the pedestrian. It sings the tune of normal’s teeth sinking into your neck as you sleep stood up with your eyes open. Amen.”

Pre Order / Pre Save

I want to be loved Everybody does I find shame in the crack-like corpse un-cadaver reign I want to be loved Everybody does I find shame gripped tight like your withering fame We made it Shame.

Hot Zumba classes at the new church I lost ten pounds for the wedding I played happy til my teeth hurt Sofa surfer extraordinaire Lambert’s ash in my falling hair, yeh.

I want to be loved Everybody does I find shame cuts rips real nice as we change lanes We made it I want to be loved Everybody does We made it We made it

Shame.

Teletext has a place in my heart Ten percent discount, I’ll show you how Gregory’s birthday in a placid town, wow Janine held the flag with white knuckles I’m burning the Astra til the wheels buckle, yeh.

I want to be loved Everybody does

Shame Shame.

NEW MUSIC: Buddy Glass – Wasted Habit

Sydney songwriter Buddy Glass (Bruno from Peabody) is back with a brand new single and video, his first since he released his self-titled solo album in 2014. ‘Wasted Habit’ comes from his forthcoming new album Wow & Flutter, due out September 4th on Glass Half Empty Records.

‘Wasted Habit’ is a hard-strummed acoustic and densely fuzzed out electric shakedown. There’s desperation and anxiety in the frantic twitch and thrash of its sound, like clinging on for dear life as you hurtle towards the inevitable.

“I recorded the vast majority of the album on 4-track cassette in the back room of my house in Marrickville, in between dogs barking and babies crying – but this track was done on a digital 8-track machine I’ve had for over 20 years.”

Buddy Glass on ‘Wasted Habit’:

“It’s a song about knowing the outcome of a situation before it happens, but nothing you try to say or do stops you from taking the steps necessary to fulfill that outcome, even when that means a raw deal for everyone involved. It’s like being in a car crash but also witnessing it from the outside. It’s essentially about determinism over free will. The video clip features me flailing and dancing around in a cat mask in a David Lynch-style room. My friend said it was like Ian Curtis trying to dance like Peter Garrett. I hope that’s accurate.”

NEW MUSIC: Jo Meares – The Dirty Game Of Art

Synthesised terrains of psychedelic melancholia delivered in a weathered tone, halfway between a whisper and a growl.

Following the release of A Handful Of Smoke (2009) and One More Time (2010) with The Honeyriders, his acclaimed solo albums King Of The Crystal Mountain(2014), Back To The World (2018) and last year’s singles ‘The Dream Hotel‘ and ‘Fields Of Yesterday‘, Australian songwriter Jo Meares recently began a new and creatively fertile collaboration with Melbourne musician Anth Dymke (Pony Face).

Premiered on UK website Backseat Mafia, ‘The Dirty Game Of Art’, a dark dive into temptation and sin, is the first taste of a full-length album that Meares and Dymke are currently writing and recording.

“‘The Dirty Art of Game’ is epic, cinematic musical prose that has a satisfying air of a life steeped in indulgence, pain and joy. Utterly cathartic. An album is in the cards, which I, for one, cannot wait to hear.” – Backseat Mafia (Arun Kendall)


Meares’ evocative and poetic songwriting, combined with Dymke’s musicianship and production have resulted in an immersive sound that blends elements of post rock and psychedelia with a widescreen cinematic quality. One can hear the ghost of Leonard Cohen and the artistry of Nick Cave and Warren Ellis in Meares and Dymke’s compositions.

“Anth Dymke is, to my mind, one of Australia’s greatest bass players,” says Meares. “He does not simply play the bass but create a whole mood and atmosphere with his playing. It was a great honour in 2019 when he put his hand up to play bass with my band. There was an immediately musical connection and the whole performance of the band was lifted by his playing and energy,” recalls Meares.

“What I did not realise is that Anth is also a brilliant producer. I started to send him files of songs I was working on and he would turn those fairly simple recordings into something quite brilliant, but always preserving and expanding the aesthetic I had presented to him,” Meares explains.

Likewise for Dymke, the process of applying his compositional abilities to Meares’ songs has been a particularly rewarding experience. “The first time I heard Joe’s music I immediately felt a cinematic presence in it. Joe tells stories in his music and I was keen to start shaping some ideas around those stories of love and loss. Joe had always used very talented players in his previous recordings, and I was keen to slightly move away from that to a more synthesised, bleak, but glorious terrain. Landscapes created by an array of different textures feels like a good palette in which to ground Joe’s evocative storytelling skills.”

The visual component of Meares’ music is always an important part of his artistic vision and he has paired the song with a video that was filmed between the Spanish cities of Bilbao and Gernika as he returned from a gig. The evocative cover art for the single is a photo of Meares’ face superimposed on a 3-D printed sculptural bust of himself, creating an otherworldly, Lynchian quality.