ALBUM REVIEW: Roadhouses – Roadhouses

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They say that it is harder to play music slowly than it is to play it fast. Things fall apart and momentum is lost. In the case of Sydney trio Roadhouses, sedated rock music is their calling card. They deal in drifting, alt-country-imbued, slowcore torch songs where heartache is just a tear away. If you got Lucinda Williams to front Spain, at the Twin Peaks Roadhouse – you’d have a pretty accurate summation of the sound and aesthetic of this album.

Skirts as short as sin, drinks that don’t touch the side – you get the picture of where Yvonne Moxham takes her songs. Late night bars, heartbreak and yearning populate her songs of burgeoning and fracturing relationships. First you’ll be mesmerised by the band’s haunting, atmospheric sound, then drawn in by Moxham’s lyrics that hang heavy in the air. Drummer Cec Condon (Mess Hall) throws inventive rhythms and accents into the mix, like a slow motion Jim White. 

‘Black Lights’ throws a subtle curveball into proceedings with its melancholic synths and trip hop drumming that brings to mind Everything But The Girl jamming with Cowboy Junkies. Elsewhere, ‘Heartless’ recalls the haunting minimalism of Low and in ‘Drinkin’’ they conjure up a wonderfully lush, swoon and swell of a sound. Sadness, pain and bruised romance never sounded as good as it does on this excellent debut album.

Chris Familton

 

LIVE REVIEW: Cash Savage & The Last Drinks @ The Lansdowne, Sydney

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Cash Savage & The Last Drinks, Blake Scott, Roadhouses @ The Lansdowne, Sydney – 23rd June, 2018

With a new album Good Citizens on the horizon and a fresh new single out in the world, Cash Savage & The Last Drinks hit Sydney with a fine pair of opening acts in tow. 

Roadhouses also have new music freshly imparted to the universe and they played a typically strong set. Their sound suits the size of the Lansdowne live room with it’s compact stage and always spot-on sound. The trio showcased their new album, slowing heartbeats to the shimmering drowsy tempo of their music. They’re a band who know how to get the most out of well placed instrumentation, leaving notes hanging in the air. When they did get busier it was Cec Condon’s drums and James Bellesini’s bass that added subtle details. It was only the last minute of their set where the tempo increased into a Velvet Underground-esque accelerated strum.

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Blake Scott is travelling the solo route while his band The Peep Tempel are on hiatus. You get the sense he is finding it a therapeutic experience – getting to scratch his musical itch on stage, yet there  are also cracks in his stoicism, particularly in his between-song comments that suggest he’d rather have the full band on stage with him. There’s a real appreciation for his guitar playing that takes it’s own exploratory trip through his songs, independent of, yet also fully complementing his words and melodies. Warmly received by the audience, he’s a hard songwriter to pigeonhole and one gets the sense that’s exactly how he likes it.

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Cash Savage has firmly established herself on the strength of her songwriting and live performances, and with The Last Drinks behind her you’d be hard pressed to find a more exhilarating and heart swelling live band in this country. Their set was perfectly paced, beginning slow and moody, all their power in the restraint of their playing. Slowly, song by song they opened their shoulders and loosened their hips, fully immersing themselves in the cathartic aspect of playing the songs. Savage  possesses one of the most commanding thousand yard stares, her eyes fixed on the back wall of the venue, occasionally scanning and momentarily locking eyes with various punters. The new single Better Than That was resplendent in its warm pulse and glow, referencing the marriage equality events of last year. Other new songs sounded equally impressive but the strength of familiarity meant that crowd favourites such as Rat-A-Tat-Tat, the lurching Let Go and a version of Run With The Dogs that teased and teased before lifting off with sonic gusto. There’s a tension in the music that Savage clearly knows is crucial to protect. The more she holds onto that, the more powerful the effect when it’s released, and as evidenced by the moving mass of bodies and satiated grins, the greater the experience for both band and audience.

Chris Familton

NEW MUSIC: Roadhouses – Black Lights

 

 

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Sydney slowcore dream rock trio Roadhouses have released their second single from their forthcoming self-titled debut LP.

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Pre-order Roadhouses 

‘Black Lights’ is an atmospheric piece of late-night, wistful psychedelia with Cec Condon’s drumming recalling Portishead and Yvonne Moxham delivering a beautifully melancholic vocal. Sweet sadness never sounded so good.

 

LIVE REVIEW: Infinity Broke, Day Ravies, Roadhouses @ Brighton Up Bar, Sydney (02/10/15)

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Bathed in red light, Roadhouses created a similarly late-night, intoxicated vibe with a set that was equal parts slowcore and codeine country like like Lucinda Williams fronting Spain. Yvonne Moxham’s guitar shimmered via drawn out chords that hung in the air while she sang songs on the sadder side of romance. Less is more in Roadhouses and the rhythm section featuring Cec Condon (Mess Hall) were the perfect foil, filling in the spaces with deft and delicate touches where required.

Day Ravies upped the ante tenfold in terms of volume and energy, their expanded line-up now including Kate Wilson (The Holy Soul, The Laurels) and a second guitarist. With the juxtaposition of Sam Wilkinson’s snarling voice and the lighter melodic phrasings of Caroline de Dear and Lani Crooks they dove straight into a set that careened through US-style indie rock, twee C86 guitar pop and layered shoegaze textures. Musically they nailed it with their wonderful balance of primitive crush and detailed nuances but the vocal interplay was too disconnected and at times a distraction from the music.

Infinity Broke were lucky to have original drummer Jared Harrison back behind the kit for a gig that was right up there with the best shows they’ve played. Balance is the key to the band’s sound. All of the instruments sounded embedded in just the right place both in terms of the performance and the sound mix. Song-wise the set was a perfectly paced, from the concise and menacing rock of Only The Desert Grows and the staggered dynamics of Papa Was A Clown to the live centrepiece – Monsoon – stretched to what felt like 20 minutes with bassist Reuben Wills taking up residency in the audience while the the taut krautrock pulse and freeform guitar squalls stretched deep into the night. Gloriously inventive avant-rock at its finest.

Chris Familton