NEWS: Boris Announce New Album ‘NO’ and Release Single ‘Loveless’

Japanese genre-destroyers Boris return with a new album, NO, due out July 3rd, self-released on Bandcamp. Check out the searing, careening distortion punk-fest that is ‘Loveless’.

A message from BORIS: 

“International borders are ‘closed’ now. 

All kinds of anxieties, fear, sadness, anger, and hatred have arisen to drive the world apart.Everyone is in a process of trial and error, doing what they can to live.The critical state of the world has placed culture, art, and other means of expressing ourselves into a dilemma as well.We decided to start managing our band ourselves again a few years ago, so we even more keenly aware of the current situation. 

It was our actions up to this point and our methodology, various cultural influences, as well the connections and support we received from people around the world that led us to create this latest album. 

Culture is lore that is not bound by blood, in other words ‘Non Blood Lore.’ 

We have put all of our influences and connections into this album so that they may be passed on circulated.That is our current stance now as Boris, our role and mode of action. 

The title of this album is NO. People have a system whereby they unconsciously grow accustomed to things and adapt to them.But, this same system is also cursed in the way it allows inconvenient or troubling things to be disregarded as if they were never there to begin with and goes by other names such as ‘resignation,’ ‘subordination,’ and ‘forgetfulness.’We renounce this system.‘Is this something I felt on my own? Is this idea something I came up with on my own? Is this something I chose to act upon myself?’Everything begins with questioning and denying oneself.That is the proper stance for people to adopt. 

Music and culture possess incredible power.The anger and discontent we had no outlet for in our youth shone through in our music, helping us to channel negative energy channeled towards creative ends and leading us to new means of expression and artistry.We hope this latest album can be a mirror that gathers and reflects people’s negative energy at a different angle, one that is positive.That is the power and potential of the dark, extreme, and brutal noise music that we have experienced up to this point.Today’s society is littered with words that may or may not be true, making it easy to want to just not listen to what anyone has to say.But, that’s all the more reason why we hope that you will at least open your ears to these songs sung in the language of another land.These shouts that have no proper meaning as words will help release the raw, unshaped emotions within you.This is ‘extreme healing music.’ 

International borders are ‘closed’ now.When we’re able to travel again, it will be proof that the world has moved forward.We pray for the day when we can share the same time and place again. 

Boris

What Should We Call It? (Naming an Album)

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by Chris Familton

Choosing a name for the collection of songs that you’ve spent hours, days or often years sweating into existence can be a stressful and difficult exercise. There are countless tales of bands leaving it to the last minute with no inkling of what to christen their creative work. There are also many albums where the musician has a theme, concept and a title clearly defined in their mind as they write, or at the very least, record their album; Neil Young’s Greendale being a good example.

Over the years there have been some seminal albums with names that sound as perfectly formed as the music contained within. Of course it can be hard to separate the title from the music much in the same way that a child becomes their name, even if it initially sounded like a ridiculous moniker. Marquee Moon, Raw Power, Meat Is Murder, Nevermind, Loveless, Sweetheart of the Rodeo – they all convey emotion and a visceral connection to the music they are attached to.

Conversely there have been some absolute clunkers attributed to albums regardless of how good the music is. Eric Clapton’s latest Old Sock, Elton John’s Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy, Paul McCartney’s Kisses on the Bottom, Coldplay’s Mylo Xyloto and Limp Bizkit’s Chocolate Starfish and the Hotdog Flavored Water only scrape the surface of terrible album names that could never be redeemed by the music they grace. One wonders if those around them ever thought to pipe up and say “Excuse me Sir Paul, with all respect do you really think it is a good idea to call your album Kisses on the Bottom?” Maybe the names were all just victims of a bad sense of humour or a tragic pun like Toby Keith’s Shock’n Y’all or Blink 182’s Enema of the State but regardless there is no excuse for sabotaging all that hard work in a few syllables or words.

Often a song title will provide the name of the album. Mostly this is the case, presumably as the chosen song in some way represents the mood or theme of the record or because it is a catchy phrase that will linger in the listener’s mind. Too often acts take the cop-out route and go with their own name – the self-titled syndrome. Perhaps it was John Lydon’s PiL who found the best way to circumvent having to decide on something when they christened their 1986 release – Album.

this piece was first published as an interview sidebar in Drum Media streetpress